Title

Sitting In Darkness: New South Fiction, Education, And The Rise Of Jim Crow Colonialism, 1865-1920

Document Type

Book

Publication Date

2008

Published In

Sitting In Darkness: New South Fiction, Education, And The Rise Of Jim Crow Colonialism, 1865-1920

Abstract

Sitting in Darkness explores how fiction of the Reconstruction and the New South intervenes in debates over black schools, citizen building, Jim Crow discrimination, and U.S. foreign policy towards its territories and dependencies. The author urges a reexamination not only of the contents and formal innovations of New South literature but also its importance in U.S. literary history. "Many rarely studied fiction authors (such as Ellwood Griest, Ellen Ingraham, George Marion McClellan, and Walter Hines Page) receive generous attention here, and well-known figures such as Albion Tourgee, Mark Twain, Frances E. W. Harper, W. E. B. Du Bois, Sutton Griggs, George Washington Cable, Thomas Dixon, and Owen Wister are illuminated in significant new ways. The book's readings seek to synthesize developments in literary and cultural studies, ranging through New Criticism, New Historicism, postcolonial studies, black studies, and "whiteness" studies."--BOOK JACKET

Published By

University Press of Mississippi

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